Chinese culture of dating

For this year’s Double Seventh Festival, the Chinese equivalent of Valentine's Day observed on August 20, Chinese lovers living abroad may have something to celebrate.

More than 40 percent of overseas Chinese now say it's okay to date two or more people at the same time before establishing a relationship - clashing with traditional Chinese norms.

Expectations about gender roles are much more conservative in traditional Chinese culture than in American culture.

If an American boy goes out to dinner with a Chinese girl and does not pay for her meal, the locals will view him he as having lost "face" or social status and they will regard him as a poor dating candidate.

The initiation and maintenance of intimate, romantic relationships have been linked with improved physical and emotional well-being, stronger perceptions of community attachment, and better developmental outcomes for the individuals (e.g., Amato ).

During adolescence and the early adult years, dating enhances identity formation for individuals and provides socialization experiences which are necessary to forming and maintaining intimate and interpersonal relationships in life (Chen et al. Although researchers have directed their efforts toward a better understanding of the dynamics of dating and partner selection, focusing upon the influence of such elements as the family environment (e.g., parental divorce, parental marital quality, parent-child relationships), peer relationships, and community factors (Bryant and Conger ), the majority of studies focusing upon dating and romantic relationships have utilized samples of Western youth.

“And also the longer you stay in the United States, the more acceptable you are to dating multiple people at the same time.” Between May 29 and June 23, 2Red Beans polled Chinese living in the United States, Canada, England and France, among other countries, to learn their views on topics like romance and dating.

More than 80 percent said men and women should date only one person at a time.

From parental pressures to societal stereotypes, get a first hand perspective on Chinese dating in America right here!

By Katherine Chong In America, the Chinese community is represented by all walks of life – educated and unschooled, Buddhist and Christian, immigrant and American-born, first generation to sixth.

Women, in particular, appear to be more focused on pragmatic qualities in prospective partners.

The influence of individualist values and the changing cultural norms pertaining to dating and familial roles are discussed.